Self Love

I have fallen madly, passionately, head-over-heels in love with … myself. I think we have a tendency to brush off the idea, “yeah, I love myself.  Anyway, now back to the important things I was doing…” But if you think about what it means to be in love and how you want to be loved, it can take on a whole new dimension.   WHAT WE WANT In a relationship, we want to be told we’re beautiful, and have the person really, truly mean it (not like, “you’d be more beautiful IF…”).  We want to have our needs met on demand:  whether that’s a need for a jacket when it’s cold outside or a glass of water when we’re thirsty.  We want our ideas listened to and thought about in a considerate way.  We want to not be rushed – ever. Why can’t we do this for ourselves?  If we’re not doing that, why not? I think at some level, we all love ourselves.  I never thought to myself, “I don’t like/love myself.”  But a good relationship – or even better than that – a great relationship celebrates that love, or you could call it a romance even to a higher degree. When you’re in a long-term relationship with someone (like yourself), you tend to start taking the love for granted.  “Of course I love myself, why wouldn’t I?”  But I like the idea of rekindling the self-love/romance for yourself. STOP WITH THE “C-WORD” That’s “criticism.” Being self-critical is the antagonist of self-love.   No-one wants to be in a relationship with someone who is always criticizing them.  It’s...

How to Get Fit

Exercise doesn’t have to be punishment.  In fact, your results will infinitely improve if you enjoy the process, not torture yourself. Exercise as a form of punishing yourself to fitness will never work in the long run because #1 you will hate it and eventually quit #2 stress hormones cause weight gain So find something you love to do and do it.  Don’t worry about calories burned.  Don’t worry about what your favorite celebrities are doing to stay fit.  Don’t worry about what your friends will think. Just move your body. Enjoy the movement:  the sensations that you get from your body as you move.   A lot of times the “exercise” doesn’t sound like real exercise.  Like archery or skiing.  It’s more like a hobby.   In France and New York City, people walk everywhere so they don’t necessarily have to make a concerted effort to “work out,” because their life is a series of movements.   Some of the fittest people I know are training for a special event:  a dance competition, a cycling race or triathlon, or a baseball/football/tennis game.  In these cases, I don’t think the person struggles to make it to the gym because the bigger goal is in mind:  the performance and, well, winning.  Because winning is fun – for some.  And performing is fun for some people too.   So, what’s fun for you?  What inspires your body to move more?...

Beef: friend or foe?

  Red meat is perhaps the most misunderstood food out there. “Red meat increases your cholesterol.”  “Red meat makes you gain weight.”  “Red meat is bad for your digestion.”  “I’m eating so bad this week. (ME: ‘what are you eating?’) Red meat.”   Here’s the true facts about beef (and buffalo and lamb): Quality Matters Not all red meat is made the same.  Conventional feeding organizations (CFO), where most of the meat in the US is from, (98.5% of it to be exact) unfortunately, is not the same as the grass-fed beef from your local farmer’s market.  CFO cows are usually fed corn and soy, which makes the animal fatter, and, therefore, more toxic.  The vitamin content in the meat is less than it is from healthy cows.  Cows in nature, AKA healthy cows, eat grass.  The beef has more omega 3s and typically doesn’t have added chemicals like hormones and antibiotics that many CFOs use on their animals. Find What Works For Your Body Type Rather than blindly agreeing to the latest food documentary, book, or even what I say, try it yourself.  If you’re tired, anemic, or have “O” blood type, try incorporating a small amount of good quality red meat into your diet one or two times a week.  Pay attention to how you feel afterward.   Some people do have food allergies, which may include beef.  If you feel terrible after eating it, you should seek the help of a clinical nutritionist who can direct you to other options for optimizing your diet, and possibly use NAET or food enzymes to improve your body’s reactions...

If You Have Social Anxiety, Read This

The things that we see in other people that make us nervous … or angry …  or hopeful … or jealous … are things that we are and that we do too. You’re unique, but yet, you’re not.  We all experience very similar things at different times. *Someone is driving bad.  So do you (at times, come on, admit it). *Someone you see looks great, but they seem a little too cocky about it.  A little stuck up.  There’s a part of you that can look down on others too. *Some people accomplish a lot, they’re heroes.  Selfless and giving.  You have the same capacity for helping others too. *Someone is spacing out and not listening to you.  You do that too at times. *OMG, they’re so cute!  You are cute! *Someone close to you notices all your faults and points them out to you.  I’m sure you do that to people you’re close to as well. *Someone is looking a little rough; a little unkempt.  How did you look when you just woke up this morning?*You notice someone who looks just perfect:  perfect body, perfect hair, perfect clothes.  You have looked that good to someone before too. *The homeless man on the corner.  We’ve all lost jobs before or made bad decisions.  We all have ups and downs. *You notice someone’s hair loss or wrinkles; that’s going to be you some day. *Someone is bigger (or smaller) than you.  Everyone is bigger or smaller than someone else. *Someone’s being loud when you’re trying to relax or concentrate.  Sometimes you’re loud too. *If you’re crushingly depressed, someone else has...

Dear Vegans,

Vegan diets have become more popular in the last couple years.  Don’t get me wrong:  a vegan meal can be very healthy.  Vegetables are necessary and so good for you; they’re the best!  But for some nutrients – zinc, B12, protein, D, omega 3s, and iron – the best source for these are animal proteins.  Sure, you can take a vitamin for those missing nutrients, but the quality of most vitamins are quite terrible.   Most vitamins are synthetic and made in a laboratory.  Centrum, a multivitamin many trust, is made by the drug company Pfizer.  Of course, how they make the vitamins are closely guarded industry secrets.  I’ve heard that synthetic B-vitamins are made from coal tar and other unsavory things.  If they were made from real food, they would list real food on the label.   Enriched foods laden with synthetic B-vitmains, like some cereals, rice, and flours, are worse for you than a B-vitamin deficiency.   Dogs fed a diet of synthetic B-vitamins suffered neuromuscular degeneration and early death (Dr. Agnes Fay Morgan’s studies).  The problem with synthetic vitamins is that they’re too pure!  Meaning, our bodies are meant to digest and assimilate nutrients in their natural state.  The natural state of food – all real foods – is a mixture of several elements:  fats, vitamin compounds, and fiber, for example.  Many long-standing vegans and vegetarians will argue that all those nutrients are found in plants.  But for our bodies we want the “best source” for those nutrients not just “any source.”  Some things are more bioavailable and easily absorbed in some forms than in others....
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